Frequently asked questions about the Improving Healthcare Together 2020-2030 programme

FAQs

Clinical Commissioning Groups (CCGs) are responsible for planning and commissioning health services for local areas. Surrey Downs, Sutton and Merton NHS CCGs are working together to look at the challenges in the local area and consider how we can continue to deliver high quality, sustainable services.

Yes. This is a more comprehensive review being led by local CCGs in response to feedback from the Trust that it cannot continue to deliver its current services if changes aren’t made.

No. We will not close any hospitals – the local area needs both Epsom and St Helier hospitals.

No. We will continue to provide all services within the combined geographies; the challenge is to make sure they are organised in the best way.

Our early engagement phase has now closed. If any significant changes are proposed, commissioners would assess these and fully consult the public before making any decisions. We do not expect any consultation to take place until 2019.

The Improving Healthcare Together 2020-2030 programme is currently engaging on the challenges identified within our Issues Paper.

Engagement may be described as the ongoing discussions NHS organisations have with partners and key interest groups. It ensures that developing ideas take into account the views of those groups which may be more affected by change (for instance, protected characteristics groups defined by the Equality Act 2010) at the earliest possible stage.

Consultation is a statutory process which is undertaken when there is a proposal to change healthcare services and where the change is considered significant. NHS organisations will work with local government to consider whether a specific change is significant and if consultation is required. During consultation the NHS will seek to take the views of everyone who wishes to participate.

Our early engagement phase has now closed.

We will continue to work with our communities to improve local services. If any significant changes are proposed, commissioners would assess these and fully consult the public before making any decisions. We do not expect any consultation to take place until 2019.

The aim of the options consideration workshops is to help us decide which quality criteria we should use on potential solutions to the challenges we have identified, how we should weight those criteria so they are considered fairly, and to evaluate the options against those weighted criteria.

We are running these workshops with members of the public as well as patient representatives, clinical staff, NHS professionals and other experts.

Participants consider all the evidence, including feedback from early engagement and any data gathered, to decide how best to tackle local challenges.

They are being independently facilitated and scrutinised to ensure we have a fair and robust process.

Read more information about the workshops.

Read more information about the options consideration process.

Improving Healthcare Together