NHS

Specialist emergency care hospital


Specialist staff all under one roof

Very sick patients who normally arrive by ambulance, or patients who could be at risk of becoming very ill, would be treated in a new specialist emergency care hospital. Specialist staff and services would be brought together to work as one larger team and would be available 24 hours a day in a new purpose-built hospital. This would mean specialist staff would always be in the hospital and available to care for the sickest patients. The hospitals would be able to meet all of the quality standards and provide the highest standards of care. They would be able to diagnose what is wrong with patients more rapidly, start the best treatment faster, and help patients recover more quickly.

Births

We have included births at the specialist emergency care hospital to make sure mothers and babies have safe, high quality care. In an emergency, they need access to on-site surgeons and critical care. For women who are low risk and would like to give birth at home we would continue to encourage and support them to do so.

Delivering the highest standards of care

We believe that organising hospital services like this would mean we would be able to deliver the highest standards of healthcare for people who are very unwell, or are giving birth in hospital, and provide excellent care locally for the majority of services. This includes routine and urgent care and supporting people to get back on their feet.

Epsom and St Helier hospitals see around 2,500 patients a day

This means that the vast majority of patients would continue to be seen at their local district hospital, with a much smaller number of patients attending the new purpose-built specialist emergency care hospital.

Quality standards that we currently cannot meet

Next > Examples of what these changes would mean for you and your family

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